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Club EvMed: Lessons from 3.5 Billion Years of Life: What biological evolution tells us about success in countering catastrophic risks - Shared screen with speaker view
Jean Raffanel
16:46
Than you for having us
Dr Charles Nunn, Ph.D.
25:34
Please feel free to post questions or comments here, and we will discuss at the end of the presentation.
Jay Labov
39:34
Infectious diseases are clearly biological. Can an evolutionary perspective be used to deal with other limited resources? For example, in 1999 the Water for the FutureThe West Bank and Gaza Strip, Israel, and Jordan (1999)
Jay Labov
40:07
Sorry. I hit enter and it sent prematurely. I'll resend the full message.
Jay Labov
43:07
Infection diseases are clearly biological. Can evolutionary perspectives be used to deal with other limited resources? For example, in 1999 the U.S. National Academy of Sciences; Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities; Palestine Academy for Science and Technology; Royal Scientific Society, Jordan jointly published "Water for the FutureThe West Bank and Gaza Strip, Israel, and Jordan." The report can be downloaded for free at https://www.nap.edu/catalog/6031/water-for-the-future-the-west-bank-and-gaza-strip.
Emily Ruhs
43:54
There are a handful of papers that show a relationship between brain size and ability to cope with novel environments (see Benson-Amrma, PNAS 2015), Daniel Sol papers, etc.
Neha Shet
44:22
humans dont possess the protective things like lots of hair and chitinous cover or really thick statum corneum so if we say lost all of these while evolving and instead grew larger brains can it be a mistake given times like these also do you think that there could have been kind of human species that would have brains and protective surfaces?
Oscar Sanchez
46:54
Could it have to do with the same mechanism of joining when there is one outside the group that attacks us?
Dr Charles Nunn, Ph.D.
49:47
Here is one of the papers I was thinking of, https://boterolab.weebly.com/uploads/1/1/9/1/119146867/fristoe_et_al-2017-nature_ecology___evolution.pdf. Seems like there is an opportunity to do similar phylogenetic comparative research on social learning and predictability of environment (although looks like from this paper that causality is hard to discern)
Michael Reiskind
01:16:25
I’m having some connectivity problems, so I’m signing out, but great discussion.